Josiah Wedgwood Part II: Queen Charlotte’s Potter

Once Josiah Wedgwood ended his partnership with Thomas Whieldon and struck out on his own his career began to truly hit its stride. The shop he rented from his uncles, the Ivy Works, was soon too small to hold his expanding business.

Wedgwood turned out innovation after innovation. The plates, pots, and . . . → Read More: Josiah Wedgwood Part II: Queen Charlotte’s Potter

Josiah Wedgwood : First Name in Pottery and Porcelain Part I

Wedgwood was a family name long before it came as close as any surname can to being synonymous with a craft. Josiah Wedgwood was not even the first potter to bare the name. His great-great-grandfather, Gilbert is described in a surviving document as a master potter.

The man that would eventually be . . . → Read More: Josiah Wedgwood : First Name in Pottery and Porcelain Part I

Mending Antique China Plates: A Clean Break

One of the great pleasures of owning old china and porcelain is that unlike many antiques, you get to use it in the same manner as the first hands that held it. It is a wonderful sensation to take a moment at a holiday dinner served on old china and contemplate the number . . . → Read More: Mending Antique China Plates: A Clean Break

A Brief History of Spode – Copeland China: Part I

The world of 18th century English porcelain was a small one. Due to the necessity of soil with just the right mixture of elements in the making of porcelain factories have always been closely bound by geography. The strident apprenticeship system that dominated all trades in England at the time combined with physical . . . → Read More: A Brief History of Spode – Copeland China: Part I

Prurient Porcelain: Nudes and Ribaldry

Every visual art medium from wood carving to painting, from textiles to mosaics, will sooner or later be used to glorify the human, usually female, form. Ceramics and porcelain are certainly no exception. Despite an inaccurate modern association of china with grandmotherly tea rooms and the height of propriety there have always been . . . → Read More: Prurient Porcelain: Nudes and Ribaldry